Posts tagged ‘art’

December 4, 2013

World Stage 2014 – Artistic Director’s Statement #artlive

this fills me with anticipation and excitement for 2014. Read on.

We’re going to try this a little differently. We need to.

We’re going to start by trying to have the courage to face the conditions we’re in. And the conditions we’re in are very uncertain.

The fact is that we just don’t know about a lot of things. We don’t know how to preserve the environment. We don’t know how to treat each other with justice and fairness. We don’t know how to relax. We don’t know how to live within our means. We don’t know how to take care of our elders and we don’t know how to raise our children.

We don’t know how to believe in our politicians and we don’t know how to change the system. We don’t know how to love and we don’t know how to die. We don’t know how to remember and we don’t know how to forget.

And we don’t know how we are – although we have a few ideas.

When I write “we” I could be writing about our city or our country or the world (and I think that these words would probably be true) but the “we” I’m writing about is actually more modest. The “we” I’m writing about are people who make the shows in this series and the people at World Stage who help put them on and fight to keep them accessible. “We” are the ones who don’t know. But we have a feeling that, in this regard, we’re a lot like you. And that possibility is what justifies all the risks we take with this programme.

Because we are taking risks. The work in World Stage 2014 is messy, beautiful and provoking. It’s a challenge. It’s not easy – but neither is understanding the world and how we can live in it.

The best, gentlest understanding of the world is arrived at not from isolated facts but from the appraisal of relationships and equivalencies – between questions and certainties, culture and politics, artists and audiences.

I think World Stage is the place where this can happen.

Like the equals sign, World Stage is neither the answer nor is it the question. It’s the structure that makes it possible to see the relationship between the two.

If this connects with you, if you’re up for the enlivening challenge, I urge you: let us know, share, talk to us in person and on #artlive. Most of all, be a part of World Stage 2014.

Join us. Let’s figure out who we are.

Tina Rasmussen

@tinarasmussen

Artistic Director, World Stage

April 18, 2013

The Promised Arts PSAs

PLAY-ProudI said yesterday that once I’d finished shaking my head, I’d be back today with a stack of art-type PSAs . Lisa and I have compiled  the following.
Actually, before we get to them, I wanted to tell you how immensely thrilled I am that Proud has been picked up by GCTC in Ottawa to open their 2013 season in September. So very, very pleased.

1) The Gladstone Hotel offers life-drawing classes almost every Wednesday night at 8 pm, usually in the Art Bar. Bring your own materials.

2) Call for Submissions: Applications Open for the Next Stage Theatre Festival – click here for details.

3) Seth Godin’s Field Guide to the Meeting Troll – we’ve all been in meetings with this person.

4) From Imagine Canada – Five Common Mistakes in Grant Writing

5) Call for Submissions: StART Mural Program, StreetARToronto and an excellent accompanying article about street art

6) The 2013 Fringe Festival is just around the corner, and having completed the first read-through of Dan Reddican’s musical It’s Always You  last week, the hunt for rehearsal spaces has begun. Luckily for us (and you!) the Fringe has compiled a list of rehearsal spaces around the city. It’s a reliable and comprehensive list with specific details about sizing and pricing, and it will depend on what suits your needs. Our top three spaces so far are COBA (585 Dundas St. E, Suite 130 Daniels Spectrum), the Bloor St. United Church (300 Bloor Street W) and Lower Ossington Theatre (100A Ossington Ave).

7) And finally – further to yesterday’s post about your product and your brand – from gettingattention.org courtesy a friend of mine – How to Communicate in the Midst of Tragedy.  Number Six is a doozy.

February 11, 2013

I Didn’t Know the Pope Could Quit

well, I didn’t. I assumed he had to die in office, so to speak. And now I’m thinking again about the fantastic movie Habemus Papam that I saw at TIFF a couple years back. You should rent it.

Anyway – here we are on a Monday morning. Looking forward to a busy client week, starting off with a meeting at OCAF, and seeing the DeChardin Project tomorrow night and 4.48 Psychosis opening Thursday.

I’m also tweaking and fine tuning the course description for the class I’m tag-teaching in March/April, which leads to two links I found last week

Avoid Lazy Language – Say What You Mean
and
27 Phrases to Slash from Your Copy

wise words in both – pun intended. New phrase I learned:  déformation professionnelle (looking at things from the point of view of one’s profession) which applies to Maslow’s hammer, which I did know about, but now have the origin of.

internet-high-five

Got five? Take a look at your copy and play a bit of buzzword/acronym bingo with it. Just so you’re aware of it.

 

January 7, 2013

A Team Player? Depends on The Position, Depends on The Team

I’ve been thinking a lot about teams lately, mostly because I am part of many different ones, and of course seeing Sudden Death at Next Stage last week. Background on that – it’s about  hockey legend John “Rambo” Kordic and his last night. From the Hockey Hall of Fame website: “A tough right-winger who could score more than most people realized, John Kordic was relegated to the role of an enforcer in the NHL. He spent parts of seven years in the NHL with four different teams.”
Enforcer is an unofficial role in ice hockey. The term is sometimes used synonymously with “fighter”, “tough guy”, or “goon”. An enforcer’s job is to deter and respond to dirty or violent play by the opposition. When such play occurs, the enforcer is expected to respond aggressively, by fighting or checking the offender. Enforcers are expected to react particularly harshly to violence against star players or goalies. (wikipedia)

Anyway, that’s the background of my “team player” headspace. That’s who he was on his team. I don’t know if he liked it, I know he was good at it, I don’t know if he was happy doing it. But that’s the kind of thing I wonder about.

Who are you on your team? Excellent question to ask. I think an even better question is “what team is it, and how does that team define “team player”? The definition seems to hit either end of the spectrum – and I found a couple of interesting results.
Definition one: a team player is someone who follows the rules and never questions authority.  To one leader, it is a sign of respect if his followers obey him.  They are truly part of the “team” when they comply with the direction he has set for it.  The organization rewards team players who do not disrupt the set flow of the organizational structure the leader has established for the organization, and punishes those who fail to play as a part of the “team”.
Definition two: The leader expects that each person on the team will play a part in helping the organization set goals and see those goals become reality.  The leader is offended when someone on the team refuses to bring his or her own original ideas for the entire organization to the table for discussion or feels his or her input is not welcome. If one member on the team struggles, it affects the entire team and it becomes the entire team’s responsibility to help them.  The leader believes that each team has a leader, who must make final decisions and set ultimate vision for the organization, but  welcomes challenge to my authority if done with the intent of helping the organization succeed.  Those rewarded most with this definition are those who work hardest to help the entire organization, as well as their personal area of responsibility, achieve its goals.

I’ve been a member of both types of teams. As you can imagine, the first was not the best place for me, so much that I actually took the hackneyed phrase “is a team player” off my resume. Because based on definition one – I wasn’t a team player, I questioned, I wondered, I asked why a heck of a lot. With better answers, I would have been an excellent team player in definition one.  I realized then that my position on a team is a combination of “wonderer” and “idea pusher” (a colleague called me that a few weeks ago, and suggested I put it on my business cards. Am thinking about it). And if I can’t play that position on a team, or a variation of such, it’s probably not the right team for me.

Some 2013 thinking – what kind of team player are you? What kind of teams do you run? And how do all your players fit into it? I’m not saying definition one or two is the better one, I know which is better for me personally.  How about you? Have you found your team?

Next Stage Festival is HOPPING, great reviews for Awake as well as other shows and things have already started selling out.  Time to shake off the holidays, get a ticket and keep that resolution of “see more theatre”.

December 28, 2012

2012 Round-up Part Two

Yesterday was about the top ten posts y’all read the most. Today is about what went on in 2012 that mattered to me. By the way, I’m doing this one because I saw the Facebook “Year in Review”  – A look at your 20 biggest moments from the year including life events, highlighted posts and your popular stories and was strangely unmoved by its contents. I guess I didn’t share my biggest moments properly. Anyway.

Number of interviews/articles –  2
an interview on being the Producer of Proud with Live with Culture, and a first person article for Charlebois Post on marketing. It’s still the most-read article for the month of December. Which is  extremely cool.

Number of workshops –  7
#Consultancy – Why Arts Consultants Need Their Own Online Presence Social Media for ArtistsCompass Camp Workshop,  Tools For Your Tools: Social Media Workshop for artists Technological Innovation: On and Off the Stage Shopping, Gossip, Trends and Friends – How Women are Shaping the Social Media Landscape and Parkdale Connected.

Number of Arts Marathons  1 
see – Art Is Too Expensive and There’s Nothing to Do Anyway
I had a blast doing my marathon, and even though it wasn’t in the top ten clicked on posts, it was the one that generated the most in-person conversation. I might do it again.

Number of Political Days 3
Day at the Hill in Ottawa (October), Day at the City here in Toronto (November), City Hall Deputations (December).
Politicians spoken to about the importance of Arts and Culture:
Senators 1, MPs 1 City Councillors 4.

Number of Field Trips and Guest Speaker Engagements 3
The visual arts students from Jarvis Collegiate, the Media Arts Class from Sir Oliver Mowat, the theatre students from George Brown – thank you all for being bright and talented and relieving me a bit about the future.

Corin Raymond has raised over $6000.00 in the Great Canadian Tire Money Caper. I am utterly impressed and proud to know him, both for his musical talent and business acumen.

Memorable Books Read
The Art of Racing In The Rain, Counting New Beans, Sacred Cows Make The Best Burgers, The Master Butchers Singing Club, No Culture, Before I Go To Sleep, The Power of Why, Crossing the Continent, The Cocktail Waitress.

Some of My Favourite Posts: just four. If you’d like five, then you can pick one too.

Things Cost Time and Money, Quit Devaluing Both

Cook a Meal. Do Laundry. Experience Art.

Testing Your Website in more ways than one

The Future of The Non-Profit Arts

Sunday Roundup this week will look a little wonky and full. And I’ll do some client-related highlights on Monday. And then it’s a New Year – we can talk about that when it gets here. Like, next week.

December 6, 2012

Arts, Culture, Politics, Interns, Two good Bands

Frida_KahloBrrr out there.

Spent yesterday at the AGO chaperoning a group of Grade 11 visual arts students from Jarvis Collegiate, we went to see the Kahlo-Rivera exhibit. It’s fantastic, and apparently although it’s not the first time they’ve shared an exhibit, it is the first time that their works have been interspersed with each other (as opposed to the Kahlo room and the Rivera room, type of thing). It adds a really interesting context to their pieces. The place was packed – go and see it before it closes. It was another great group of students – I had a good time, they’re quite talented and fun to talk to.

Also saw This is What Happens Next, the MacIvor-Brooks piece courtesy Necessary Angel. Great work, and thought provoking. Go see that too.

This is interesting, especially after TAPA Day At The City a couple weeks back: Councillors look to increase arts funding.

For ten years, various Toronto City Councils have periodically affirmed and re-affirmed our commitment to increase the per capita arts and culture funding to twenty-five dollars,” (the two councillors) wrote in the letter. “Unfortunately, previous political commitments remain unfulfilled.”

Budget Deputations are next week, I’m 44th on the list on the 10th. Wish me luck. On that note here are two great pieces from the fine folks at torontoist: Toronto’s 2013 Budget: A Decoder and Toronto’s 2013 Budget: How to Follow Along.

Speaking of music, two things – I saw Simple Damned Device at the Painted Lady the other night – excellent music and band. I will be paying closer attention to them. Their lyrics really twig something in me, particularly their songs “Monsters” and “Furious”. And I need to see the full lyrics for “Poor Alice”, because that said something to me too.

And do you remember a few months back I was talking about the irrepressible Corin Raymond and his Canadian Tire money campaign? He’s got over SIX THOUSAND DOLLARS. In CT Money. I know right? More info is here, including how to donate, the CD release party, etc. Mon oh man.
Sue Edworthy Arts Planing is hiring an intern. The posting should be up on Work In Culture today or tomorrow.

On that note I am off into the day. Brr out there. Keep warm! Where’s your mitts?

November 7, 2012

Big Night Last Night

It’s a good speech.

I’m off to do a webinar, and then do some work for art & lies theatre company  production of In Adagio, and do some word tweaking for The Quickening theatre company, and a social media editorial calendar for OCAF and for Young Associates.

And then I’ll do some work for Tuesday’s Day at the City.

Congrats to YPT and Nancy Webster – delighted you’re back!

September 30, 2012

Sunday Round up September 30

Well, September went fast…and I didn’t even manage to get a round-up in place last week. So!

Where have you BEEN this week?

Linky Friday

Because We’re Singing Into Theatre Season Again

22 Rules to Live By

Post Now, Nap Later, Consult in the Fall

A couple other things that caught my attention last week:

Top Toronto city managers report culture of fear, bullying   – I’d find this disturbing to hear in any workplace, but even more so in the workplace that runs our city.

And this image is an excellent addition to 22 rules to live by, and I think now more than ever – you could add in so many other distractions.

 

 

September 9, 2012

Sunday Roundup – September 9

It’s rehearsal weeks and it’s TIFF and what else went on this week?

14th in Innovation – Mom isn’t putting that grade on the fridge 

and

Theatre Picks and Street Art

It’s crazy fun busy out there, folks.

Also, if you recall that amazing little show Tale of A Town – well, they’re up for a residency at the Canadian Film Centre… but they need boosts! Super easy to help them out – click on this, you get taken to their page and you click BOOST this project and go from there. I just did it, I timed it – less than a minute, including choosing the tweet this option. Boost ’em up, willya?

Off into the Sunday-ness of Sunday!

 

September 6, 2012

14th in Innovation – Mom isn’t putting that grade on the fridge

From the Globe and Mail: Canada must refuel for cultural creativity

Sixty years ago, the Massey report created our first cultural “road map” by boldly recommending the establishment of a Canada Council to support our creative and interpretive artists.

Its recommendations also strongly encouraged a National Library and the growth of our core national cultural institutions: CBC-Radio Canada, the National Film Board, our archives and museums and scientific research. It affirmed the importance of culture to Canadian society and linked the development of a distinctive Canadian culture to our sovereignty and survival.

These recommendations produced remarkably positive results. However, culture has since been relegated to “niche” status under successive governments, and the cultural sector as a whole has been relegated to the periphery of policy-making.

So that was sixty years ago. Now from the Guardian: Why major theatre institutions should be left to die

The artists of tomorrow are not made through funding an elite, but by funding at the bottom of the pyramid – a pyramid that we have created and sustained during the good times but now seldom question, even though the landscape will look very different in the coming years.

We should stop building bricks and mortar and empires, and rid ourselves of the belief that growth is a good thing for the arts. We should put money into the bottom of the pyramid, not the top – it is only by funding the bottom that we can create the future.

Lots to think about.

In other news, our Mayor is in court proving spectacularly that stupidity isn’t illegal. Steve Kupferman from torontoist did some great live updating yesterday.

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