Posts tagged ‘Buddies In Bad Times’

December 2, 2013

two good articles from theatre practitioners – and who finished the coffee?

Read a couple of articles this weekend by Michael Wheeler – Storytelling in the immediate –  and Jacob ZimmerPolicy, politics, Rhubarb

from Storytelling:

“A character on stage may look back and tell a story — but that character continues to live in the present, in a time that’s defined as “right now” by the very play he or she inhabits (a “right now” that we, as spectators, are allowed to imagine we share, simply because we share an actual “right now” with the actor playing the character). So that, in a large-ish nutshell, is my conceptual beef: theatre can’t tell stories, because stories are always necessarily retrospective. And theatre isn’t about the past. It’s about the present.”

What I have noted recently, is a number of shows that are not performed by ‘characters’, but the actual people who created or are creating the narrative.

From Policy (and you can read the backstory here)

In negotiation, we’re well advised to find mutual shared interest and work towards a solution that benefits all parties.

This is not a negotiation. It is a debate, where multiple sides are appealing to a “third” party (people who vote) to declare a winner. We can be sad about this state of our politics but we shouldn’t be naive about the strategies being used by the other side.

Have a read of both – they both make excellent points and give you something to think about.

Coffee! I found this infographic the other day and was not surprised my profession was on the list, but that it was so high. I also need to meet some scientists – apparently they’re awake as well.

coffee_drink_job

 

October 20, 2013

Sunday Roundup – October 20

Shows closing, events happening, shows opening – a good week!

blogcap

Last matinée for Dinner at Seven Thirty today and your last chance to see it. I’d say that it was easily one of the most physically beautiful shows I’ve worked on in a while – and I worked with Opera Atelier for years.

The Rise of Online Video

You Can Sleep When You’re Dead opens this Thursday – part choose your own adventure, part be terrified in Campbell House, it’s a reminder that Halloween is upon us and though there are many Halloween offerings, I am pretty sure this is the only one that is not just a play, and not just a haunted house – it’s a fantastic combination of both. Go see.

Wrecking Ball #15 Presents… For Russia With (Gay) Love

dirty butterfly from the folks at Bound to Create goes into previews on the 30th – it’s an incredibly powerful piece by Jamaican playwright Debbie Tucker Green and the B2C folks are giving it a thought-provoking re-envisioning from their smash hit run at the 2011 Toronto Fringe. Get some tickets.

Siminovitch Prize will be announced tomorrow night – need I say more?

Happy Sunday!

October 18, 2013

Wrecking Ball #15 Presents… For Russia With (Gay) Love

wb15Because Theatre Rusticle’s Dinner at Seven Thirty is happening at Buddies in Bad Times (only til the 20th!), I’ve been working a fair bit with the fine folks who populate that venue. Buddies has always been a favourite and now even more so.  On their behalf I offer you:

Wrecking Ball #15 Presents…For Russia With (Gay) Love

Presented in association with Buddies in Bad Times Theatre

Inspired by Zee Zee Theatre’s “NYET: A Cabaret of Concerned Canadians” taking place in Vancouver on the same night!

 Canada’s hottest Queer and Allied artists perform a Perestroika of “non traditional (artistic) relations” for one night only in protest of Russia’s new anti-gay legislation.

In May 2013, Russian President Vladimir Putin ushered in new anti-gay legislation that has received public outcry worldwide.  The Wrecking Ball stands in solidarity, presenting new work by esteemed queer and allied playwrights from across the country including:

Ronnie Burkett, Dave Deveau, Catherine Hernandez, Shawn Macdonald, Daniel MacIvor, Sonja Mills, George F. Walker and Marcus Youssef.

Directed by:  Steven Bush, Esther Jun, Erica Kopyto, Moynan King,
Sue Miner
and Gein Wong

And Performed by some of Toronto’s hottest actors!

Special sneak-peak performance by The Gay Heritage Project (Damian Atkins, Paul Dunn and Andrew Kushnir)

Join The Wrecking Ball and Ally, Zee Zee Theatre, in a ONE NIGHT ONLY nation-wide protest to ring through to the bells of St. Petersburg!

SUNDAY OCTOBER 27th 2013
Buddies in Bad Times Theatre 
| 12 Alexander Street, Toronto.
Box Office opens at 12:30pm
Show starts at 8:00pm.
Pay what you can. No advanced sales.
Proceeds from this event will go to the Actors’ Fund of Canada
#WB15 thewreckingball.ca

About The Wrecking Ball

In Wrecking Ball #15, a selection of Toronto’s most relevant and daring playwrights will have one week to create a play, and directors and performers will have one week to rehearse works connected to the Issue of Russia’s new (and escalating) anti-gay policies and the questions and issues it has raised.

Founded by director Ross Manson and playwright Jason Sherman in 2003, The Wrecking Ball has been the premiere event in Canada for showcasing political works for a decade. As the birthplace of new plays by Hannah Moscovitch, Michael Healey, Roland Schimmelpfennig, Erin Shields, Judith Thompson, Colleen Wagner, David Yee, Bea Pizano, Tara Beagan, and Sky Gilbert to name a few – there is no other event like it challenging theatre artists to respond to and address the vox populi.

On the occasion of the previous two Federal elections The Wrecking Ball went National; with ‘Wrecking Balls’ hosted by theatre artists in most major cities across the country.

In both 2008 and 2011 these pan-Canadian dramatic responses to our politics garnered widespread national media attention. The Wrecking Ball is no longer a Toronto phenomenon, but an autonomous theatrical movement joined by a desire to explore current political questions, issues, desires and dreams upon the stage.

April 7, 2013

Sunday Roundup – April 7

rc_fluteNo rest for the weary this week as I spent yesterday afternoon at the first of four public consultations for spending priorities for the new arts funding. Online surveys and other consult dates are here. It was an interesting afternoon, with a full house and a great deal of discussion on spending and where artists and arts workers envision this new money going. I hope the responses are taken seriously by those collecting them, and thoughtfully added into the grand scheme of things. And I hope the momentum of the past year is maintained. It needs to be.

Sometimes Hearing is Believing  The Whipping Man is running for another week and I urge you to go and see it. Some wonderful work there.

About Yesterday…

Supporting the Arts in Many Ways, Legoland and Social Influences

Arts Funding, Social Media Presence, and Where We Work

Brendan Healy wrote an extremely brave letter last week. From TorontoistIt’s no secret that many of Toronto’s theatre companies have seen the numbers of paying customers coming through their doors shrink over the last few years. Companies have had to adjust in response—a process known euphemistically as “right-sizing.” But when the artistic director of one of Toronto’s most iconic companies—which Buddies In Bad Times, “the largest facility-based queer theatre company in the world,” definitely is—has to write a letter to the citizens of Toronto (theatre-going or not) expressing his surprise at low attendance for a new play from one of Canada’s most acclaimed and accomplished playwrights (Daniel MacIvor’s Arigato, Tokyo, in this instance), there’s a problem. ADs are not usually ones to admit a show, especially one they’ve directed themselves, isn’t performing up to their expectations in the box office.

TAPA has been working for quite some time on documenting and understanding these numbers. Quick article in the Globe and Mail last week –
Healy’s actions come less than a month after he attended a meeting to which the Toronto Alliance for the Performing Arts invited the artistic directors of some 185 professional theatre, dance and opera companies “to discuss the current climate … the current challenges.”
Details of the March 11 meeting are confidential. Nevertheless, it’s likely attendance was discussed as TAPA, established in 1979, has been gathering statistics for almost 10 years with respect to Toronto performing arts. In a brief interview Thursday, TAPA executive director Jacoba Knaapen noted that between 2005-06 and 2009-10, ticket sales to professional theatre, dance and opera performances declined by eight per cent, going to 2.3-million tickets purchased from 2.5-million.
Read more

Giving a workshop in Social Media 101 for DTRC’s Living Creatively conference. I like the setup of this one – Tierney of Tech Soup is doing the tech part, I am doing the social part. I like new formats, and am looking forward to seeing who’s there.

Off into the day. Apparently it’s spring. I wish I could see more proof of that.

OH! Was at the opening of Opera Atelier’s the Magic Flute last night – so, so beautiful. Go and see if you can. It’s an easy intro opera – populist if you will, it’s  in English and it’s  a singspiel and it’s wonderful to see so many people under the age of twenty, heck, under the age of twelve at the opera and loving it.

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