Posts tagged ‘creative trust’

April 12, 2013

Rainy Friday

imagesWow. Pouring – it’s been all the weather out there these past couple of days. It’s a read and think kind of day. Although I must mention first off I had the pleasure of speaking to a class at Quest Alternative School this week on career options – for some reason I assumed they were in grade nine or ten – instead they were in grades seven and eight and bright and funny and smart. Joy to talk with them I have now added  Zayn Malik to my overall knowledge of One Direction, as well as Perrie Edwards, the purple haired girl from the girl version of OD he’s apparently marrying/not marrying.
Client Updates! I’m pleased to report that I’m working with two new clients Atrium Theatre for a conceptual piece based on Max Freisch‘s Mein Name sei Gantenbein, also known as A Wilderness of Mirrors. We laughed as we realized that it was a Swiss play, performed by Russian actors, with a Canadian company, in a Canadian venue, namely the Cameron House. If people ask, “what are Canadian stories?” I’d say this is one of them. Details coming, it’s in June.

Secondly I’m working with Wordsmyth Theatre on their production of The Dumbwaiter, which is a play I’m quite familiar with. That’s in late May and June.

Rehearsals began last week for The Charge of The Expormidable Moose – I was at first read through and there are some amazing actors in that piece – looking forward to it. That’s in May as well. And don’t forget Sister Mary’s a Dyke with Cahoots, who are a delight to work with as well. And of course there’s always the Fringe, with Wiggly Dolly’s production of There’s Always You.

Busy. Not insanely cult of busy for the sake of it busy, but I am liking what my clients are doing these days, they are running the full gamut of theatre.

I saw this earlier in the week and I think it’s lovely, it makes me think of the murmur project. New York City Phone Booths to be Converted to Time Machines

And over at the Creative Trust blog/website, Jini has written a great article on data and its power to tell stories. And because I always like going waaay back to find the origin of things (see 99 Twethese) I love this article as well: A Brief History of Applause.  clapping was formalized — in Western culture, at least — in the theater. “Plaudits” (the word comes from the Latin “to strike,” and also “to explode”) were the common way of ending a play. At the close of the performance, the chief actor would yell, “Valete et plaudite!” (“Goodbye and applause!”) — thus signaling to the audience, in the subtle manner preferred by centuries of thespians, that it was time to give praise. And thus turning himself into, ostensibly, one of the world’s first human applause signs.”

Stay dry. It’s almost the weekend.

 

August 28, 2012

Who You’re Posting to and How You Say It.

A while back I posted an article on timing your social media posts.

And now we have an excellent reminder from Creative Trust on talking to who you’re posting to.

From the post: The professional use of social media requires discussion, thought and – ultimately – policy guidelines about who speaks for your company and what they say. I’m not suggesting that you put a stranglehold on staff, requiring that all posts and tweets go through multiple layers of approval. But it’s important to know that your presence on social media reflects your organization’s values and purpose; that you know who’s posting and why; and that you decide how to turn critics into supporters.

Couldn’t agree more. This is why it’s wildly important to have a social media policy, it’s also equally important to find your voice. Figure out who you’re talking to and how they wish you’d communicate with them. Will they indeed be annoyed by the 2b or not 2b style of tweets mentioned by Creative Trust?

Fun fact: I usually am. The e-card below has been making the rounds for weeks now, and is the first thing that pops up on Google, so it’s not just me.

Sometimes you have more than one voice, let’s face it. Donors may get a different voice than ticket buyers than so and so. For those who claim it’s disingenuous – I have s feeling we all speak to our friends differently than our Grandmas. Still you – but a different voice.

Find your voice. Use it according to the situation at hand.

 

 

August 12, 2012

Sunday Round-up August 12

The first two weeks of August are usually quiet for my blog What went on?

Pro-Artist/Anti-Institution, PTTP deadlines and a Book Sale!

and

Two Very Different Shows

Since it was so quiet, here are a couple of great articles that were on the Creative Trust blog last week:

A Good Board at Work and We Have to Tell Our Stories. Thought-provoking – enjoy!

December 1, 2011

A Message From Friends of the Arts Re: 2012 Toronto City Budget Recommendations

Hello all,
Yes I have my own platform and today  I will use it.
By now you know that the 2012 budget recommendations include a 10% cut to arts grants. This affects you possibly directly, or possibly indirectly.  But it does affect you.
This affects the theatre company that gets the sponsorship that puts on the play  that the actor performs in that the designer designs that writes the original music that requires a program that needs the headshots that buys the advertising that takes transit to the theatre that has a drink after the show that pays the babysitter that gives the reviewer something to write about that launches the playwright’s career – and they all live in the house that art built.
I ask that you do three things:
1) read the post
2) forward, share, repost, retweet the post.
A Message From Friends of the Arts
The budget brought forward  on November 28 recommends a 10% cut to arts grants totaling $1.94 million.  Budget deputations will be heard on December 7 and 8, and the final budget will be approved by City Council on January 17.

Friends of the Arts and its 20,000 supporters from every Ward calls on all City Councillors to support sustained investment in grants to artists and arts organizations in the 2012 budget.

The impact of a $1.94 million cut (10%) to arts grants will be extremely serious for Toronto residents, arts organizations and artists while offering very little short-term savings for the City’s bottom line.  It will directly cause:

  • Reduced investment in Toronto:  for every $1 granted by the City, $17.75 is raised from other sources in support of arts organizations.  If a 10% cut were applied to Toronto’s arts organizations (large and small) it would translate into a $25 million loss of investment in Toronto, affecting jobs, performances, festivals and exhibitions.
  • Fewer arts projects in neighbourhoods across the city:  TAC currently supports 250 arts projects annually with grants totaling just over $1 million.
  • Fewer individual artists will receive support: TAC currently supports 200 individual artists including writers, composers, visual and media artists with grants totaling just over $1 million.

Over 20,000 Torontonians from every ward in the City have signed the Friends of the Arts petition, calling on Toronto City Councillors to maintain investment in the arts.

In May 2011, Toronto City Council voted unanimously in favour of the Creative Capital Gains report recommending increased support for the arts to $25 per capita.

The current recommendation would reduce the city’s support for the arts to just $17 per capita, much less than competitive North American cities.

Arts and culture are essential to Toronto’s economy, generating $9 billion every year. The city achieves this economic return on a relatively small arts investment.

130,000 people work in the sector – and many more depend on related businesses, including those in hospitality and tourism.

Toronto’s arts scene is a big part of what makes Toronto a great place to live, work and visit – yet Toronto invests less in the arts than other major cities; City Council has been working to change that, and it must stay the course.

—–

Friends of the Arts is a network of arts supporters including the following organizations:  Arts Vote Toronto, Arts Etobicoke, BeautifulCity.ca, Business for the Arts, Creative Trust, Lakeshore Arts, Scarborough Arts, Toronto Alliance for the Performing Arts, Toronto Arts Foundation, Urban Arts.

Here’s the official budget document if you’re so inclined.

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