Posts tagged ‘marketing’

December 7, 2012

Whatcha Gonna Do With All That Data?

imagesShort post today. Man what a week. And am giving a deputation at budget committee Monday, so expect to hear about that too.

ANYWAY.

I keep seeing more and more analytics/SEO/data mining seminars, webinars, in person conversations being offered, there seems to be a big bump lately. I think it’s excellent. I think more arts orgs should be taking courses like these.

But I have one question – once you know, what are you going to do with this information? Once you’ve SEO’ed, then what?

Are you going to change your poster distribution areas?
Stop telemarketing?
Start holding talkbacks? Stop having talkbacks?
Post more (or less) on Facebook and Twitter? Add or subtract video?

Information is an incredible thing. I love stats. But having them is one thing, and using them is another. Collect your data. More importantly – use it to better market your art, please. If you’re not going to, then it was just an afternoon out of the office.

November 7, 2012

Big Night Last Night

It’s a good speech.

I’m off to do a webinar, and then do some work for art & lies theatre company  production of In Adagio, and do some word tweaking for The Quickening theatre company, and a social media editorial calendar for OCAF and for Young Associates.

And then I’ll do some work for Tuesday’s Day at the City.

Congrats to YPT and Nancy Webster – delighted you’re back!

November 4, 2012

Sunday Roundup November 4

Before we get int it, I must tell you that I saw The Art of Time Ensemble’s War of the Worlds yesterday and loved it. They only have one more show,  it’s this afternoon so by all mean when you’re done futzing with the clocks get a ticket and go.

Now then –

Upcoming Toronto Fringe Stuff Yes, this is from last week, but a couple of things don’t close til tomorrow and the Creation Lab Open House is worth reading about again

#Consultancy – Why Arts Consultants Need Their Own Online Presence – I’ve got a workshop coming up this week!

Who Has the Keys to the Customers? got those passwords yet?
Some fun for Sunday. Or Monday. Or whenever you read it. A flow chart to test whether or not you’re a social media addict. Via Independent Fashion Bloggers and Kelsey Tham, and then via my coastal colleague Rebecca Coleman.

 

September 21, 2012

Linky Friday

 

What a week. You might have noticed I’m working on a few things.

Opening shows…you printed and distributed the postcards and posters, and got the pre-press, and booked the ads, and created the Facebook page and you can’t seem to talk to anyone without mentioning the show you’re working on and offering dates and details and here, just take a flyer. You’ve created the buzz.

Is anyone coming? All you can do is hope so. Well, I mean you could rent a bus and drive round the city and tell people to get in, you’re taking them to a play, but you probably don’t have an F class license and –  really? Calm down.

A few links this week I’d been saving for a rainy day – today seems appropriate.

Why are you in business? The first question brands should answer
According to Mr. Sinek, by focusing on the “what” and “how,” companies miss an important opportunity to connect with customers by explaining the “why” behind the brand. When you address the why, you get to the true essence of a company and have an excellent platform for customers to relate to it.

I Want To Put You In  Category – thought this was was interesting, given the work I do.

Collaboration in kind: arts and business partnerships beyond the cheque
Despite the financial element to transactions such as these, the real strength of this approach lies in exchanges that are not based purely on money. While Robertson admits that straightforward philanthropy plays a sizable part in the funding of most arts organisations, including his own, he firmly believes that “the healthiest relationships are often based on something a bit deeper than that”

Wonderful. Happy Friday  – second preview for Proud, second show for HOMEbody. I’m outta here.

September 19, 2012

Where have you BEEN this week?

I asked someone that question yesterday and they gently reminded me it was only Tuesday. It feels farther along and I’m glad it’s not.

HOMEbody opens tomorrow night. You should get a ticket.

Proud previews tomorrow night.  You should get a ticket.

I saw Hiding Words (from you) last week. It’s beautiful. You should see that too.

What have I been doing all week? I think this article from Live With Culture sums it up nicely. I’m off to do the stuff I say I do.

September 10, 2012

How Much Can You Pay?

Thinking about PWYC today. It stand for Pay What You Can, meaning there isn’t a set price for an event, but you do need to pay something. Example from soslang.com

Person One : Hey, is there a cover charge for the show next Friday?
Person Two : Yeah man, but it’s PWYC.

There are also pay what you feel like events, where the hat is passed after the show and you put in what you thought it was worth. PWYC usually happens on traditionally “slower” nights like a Monday, or on Sunday afternoon, but they’re popping up fairly regularly now any night of the week.

Sometimes there is a suggested donation as well. Sometimes people pay that, sometimes people don’t. Sometimes you can pre-book at a PWYC, where half the seats are available to reserve at much lower price than normal, leaving the other half for lining up day of.

Today’s anonymous poll: What are we paying at PWYCs?

September 9, 2012

Sunday Roundup – September 9

It’s rehearsal weeks and it’s TIFF and what else went on this week?

14th in Innovation – Mom isn’t putting that grade on the fridge 

and

Theatre Picks and Street Art

It’s crazy fun busy out there, folks.

Also, if you recall that amazing little show Tale of A Town – well, they’re up for a residency at the Canadian Film Centre… but they need boosts! Super easy to help them out – click on this, you get taken to their page and you click BOOST this project and go from there. I just did it, I timed it – less than a minute, including choosing the tweet this option. Boost ’em up, willya?

Off into the Sunday-ness of Sunday!

 

August 15, 2012

A Post, a Clarification, An Addition

 

Post on Mission Paradox this week: Don’t Spin Yourself. Two sentences that struck me: To effectively market what you have, you must be able to see it clearly, and If I see the problems they I can create marketing that helps to deal with the problems.

And I was thinking maybe this post was a bit over-simplified – then again I come from the school of defensive pessimism,* so I tend to do this without even thinking about it – I got an email from the author:

Hi Sue

I want to expand on a blog post I wrote titled “Don’t Spin Yourself“.

There is a link between being able to see your art clearly and effective marketing.  If you can understand why people may come to your art exhibition AND why they may not come you can see some pretty dramatic improvements in your outcomes.

The way I make sure that I’m seeing art clearly is by using the pro/con approach.  Whenever I start the marketing process for art I create a list of pros and cons for each production.  For example, here is a pro/con list I created for a show being produced at my day job, August Wilson’s Jitney.

Pros

–  Strong history of producing August Wilson productions
–  Good relationship with target audiences, i.e. students, people of color, etc.
–  Good relationship with community partners, i.e. the Dusable Museum, Hyde Park Chamber of Commerce, etc.

Cons

–  The Chicago theatre scene is crowded in the month of September (when Jitney opens) may be difficult to get press attention
–  The bulk of the marketing for the show will take place in late August, a time when it is difficult to get our potential audience to pay attention because they are still in “summer” mode.
–  Top end ticket price is $65.  Is this too much for our target audience?
–  While August Wilson is popular, Jitney is one of his lesser known pieces.  It’s one of his few productions to NOT make it to Broadway.  Will we need to work harder to introduce this work to the public?

Please note that I try to make the list as specific as possible and that I try to include EVERYTHING that may hurt or help the art.  I think about the price, I think about the time of year the art is being produced, etc.

You should also notice that I list cons that I’m not even able to change.  I can’t change the time of year the show is being produced.  That decision is out my hands.  All I can do is make the best of it.

This pro/con list can help me (and you) figure out how to market the art.  For example, if I think it will be difficult to get press attention I may factor that into the revenue expectations for the show.  I may also increase the advertising budget to offset the lack of press attention.

If price is an issue, I may need to work on a limited time sale offer on tickets. You get the idea.

This pro/con list is a surprisingly simple and effective tool for great arts marketing.  Individual artists can do it, small arts organizations can do it, large organizations can do it.

Put your list together and see if it helps you make better marketing decision.

Great initial post, fabulous expansion on it. Love it. Probably because that’s pretty much how I work – I try to look for every possible angle to market to those who will come, lure in those who might come with the right assistance or incentive, and once I’ve determined who’s not coming no matter what – stop worrying about them.

I might at some out lay out a current marketing plan here that I’m working on. Maybe. Anyway – go and make your list!

*Oh stop judging. People like me are the reason the Worst Case Scenario Handbook exists. So next time you need to wrestle free of an alligator, don’t come crying to me.

(You punch it in the nose).

August 3, 2012

creating social media believers and a literary triathalon

Friday of the August long weekend!

An article for you to read on how to convince the AD/ED/GM etc that social media does work.

Two articles from quite different blogs  – Seth’s Blog and Mission Paradox – that seemingly agree on the same thing – that unanimous is not an option and the devil doesn’t need advocates. Well timed.

And if case you’re feeling literary-inspired this weekend – you have til Monday to compete in the CBC Canada Writes literary triathalon, which I think is very cool – write a poem, a short story and creative non-fic – all by Monday!

In case you are not feeling the literary groove – here is a picture of a shark and a blowfish to colour. Either way, have a darn good weekend! I myself am spending some of it figuring out what I’m going to see at Summerworks this year.

July 24, 2012

In Which We Talked

I led a workshop yesterday on marketing/PR/social media, for a very specific group of arts administrators. Smart, savvy folks that I’ve either worked with or will be working with in the future. On one hand it was great not to go to a go-to Powerpoint presentation that starts with “what is Twitter?” – on the other hand – what was I going to talk about?

And then it occurred to me that one of the most lacking resource in our world (well, everyone’s, I suppose) is time. Time to get things done, time to sort things out, and something that gets sadly left behind is time to spend with your peers and just talk about what we’re doing – what’s working, what’s not, how did you do this, here’s how we did that. Sometimes it happens one on one, sometimes over a beer after an opening night,

And so we did. I asked everyone to write down three things about marketing/PR/social media that they had questions about, or wanted to talk about. And we spent five hours doing just that – not listening to a presentation, or holding questions til the end, but talking. Getting ideas, getting advice, making suggestions. It was a wonderful way to spend an afternoon, and everyone seemed to get something out of it. For companies without dedicated marketing staff, or publicist for shows only, these type of conversations do get understandably left behind in favour of payroll, budgets or contracts.

We don’t have the luxury to do this nearly often enough. Even when we’re talking, it’s email or a scheduled meeting about one thing. If art communicates something, then that’s exactly what we did yesterday.

Big thanks to Sue from Modern Times for asking me to present to this fantastic group of folks, and to Rupal  and big thanks to the OAC for funding it.  And thanks to the participants for making time and really engaging. I think it was both time and money well spent. I’m looking forward to working with these folks again in many capacities – despite the shouts of laughter when I asked if anyone had caught a certain article in the Economist. Here you go.

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