Posts tagged ‘social media’

November 19, 2013

AntiSocial Media

from socialmedia today

…4 in 5 people are seeing increased incivility on social media, and 2 in 5 have unfriended or blocked family, friends or coworkers as a result.

Additional findings include:

  • 76 percent of respondents have witnessed an argument on social media
  •  88 percent believe people are less polite on social media than in person
  • 1 in 5 reduced in-person contact with someone over a cyber fight read more

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And at the same time: Weird Social Media Strategy

September 3, 2013

Sunday Roundup on a Tuesday

Because it was Labour Day and back to school and hopefully we are all now in our places with bright shining faces – or at least not moaning too much about it.

here we go – last week! PS I also made my first ever batch of sauce from scratch without a recipe. Pics below to prove it.  This is not a recipe blog but I am pretty pleased.

So – an (un)conference?

What Is THE GAME, client PSAs and Who’s Using What

A Day That Will Live Forever.

We Are Closed Today but here’s a thought

Since we’re talking back to school, time to think about YOUR back to school, and if you’re thinking social media visit my Panels + Workshops page to find out about three different offerings I’ve got in September: 7 weeks at Ryerson/Chang School, 3 nights with DTRC/Artists Health Centre and a one full day at Humber. Looking forward to all of them, looking forward to seeing you there!

And I now give you – The Evolution – of Sauce. By Sue Edworthy.

SAuce Evolution!-page0001

 

August 11, 2013

Sunday Roundup – August 11

And with that, it’s a month and a day til my birthday. Just sayin’.

About last week…

What to do with the Art?

Who are Your People?

Couple Facebooky articles for Clients and Colleagues

WORKSHOPS and TEACHING UPDATES!

Reminder I am giving a full day workshop September 21, in association with Humber College. Finding Your Audience: Social Media for Artists  Diving into social media can be intimidating. Expert Sue Edworthy will demystify the process and get you going on your own social media strategy in this one-day intensive workshop developed specifically for artists of all disciplines.   Both theoretical and practical, in this workshop you will learn about social media strategy and then get “hands-on” on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube etc.  Case studies from Canada and around the world will be presented to illustrate some winning approaches. Details to come soon.

And Tell Me About It with DTRC/Artists’ Health went so well, we’re figuring out a three class intensive to follow up to that, broken into beginners, strategy, and a master class. Fall 2013, details to come soon.

And back at the Chang School at Ryerson this fall for another round of CDAM 101 Communication and Promotion for the Arts. Seven weeks on Monday evenings, details to follow.

 

August 9, 2013

Couple Facebooky articles for Clients and Colleagues

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Quick note – Summerworks is open! Go see something. So far I’m booked into Eating Pomegranates Naked, Murderers Confess at Christmastime and Paradises Lost.

I’ll book more as I go and let you know.

Summer seems to be the time to analyze, tidy up, re-jig all things admin, and now social media has been added to the mix. This post is for friends and folks and clients and colleagues who are doing just that these days, and may have to report stuff to EDs, CEOs and Boards. And if you aren’t already following Mashable somehow – you should be.

Facebook: Here’s How Your News Feed Works – Your Facebook News Feed is a hodgepodge of information: some of it you love, some of it you hate, and some of it may just make you scratch your head. The average user’s News Feed has around 1,500 possible stories filtered through per day, according to Lars Backstrom, engineering manager for Facebook’s News Feed ranking. But only 20% of them actually make your feed.
So how does Facebook determine which 20% you see? read more

and

5 Social Media Tactics to Increase ROI – Social can be one of the most challenging platforms for brands to measure return on investment. Companies that grew up on traditional advertising and metrics often have trouble making sense of the value of the online ecosystem. But with 52% of U.S. consumers using the web as their primary purchase tool, it’s an area brands can’t afford to ignore. read more

I cannot emphasize #5 enough. The people I work and play with  – we live in a sea of actual creativity. We create for a living. Thusly – we do #5 automatically, without even having to think about it. Now apply it to this.

August 4, 2013

Sunday Roundup – August 4

Unbelievably, it’s August.

Last week was a week of sharing bookmarks I’ve collected over the last little while, mostly items about social media engagement.

What did we talk about?

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) – Marketing Myths

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #2 – Twitter Etiquette

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #3 – Facebook Engagement

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #4 – All Caps and Hashtag History

July 30, 2013

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #2 – Twitter Etiquette

bookmark-30Continuing on from yesterday – another bookmark – today we’re looking at Twitter Etiquette.

The 10 Essentials of Twitter Etiquette

#2 speaks for itself I think – 2. #Dont #Overuse #Hashtags #In #Your #Tweets #It #Looks #Ridiculous #Stick #To #Three #Or #Fewer #TwitterEtiquette Need we say more? No? Good, ‘cuz we’re out of space.

Why do people do this? Possibly because they want to be searched under as many criteria as possible. Most likely. But it’s irritating as all get out and makes me wonder if you really had anything to say to begin with. And if what you actually had to say is simply the base for hashtags? Hmm.

#5 – equally valid. 5. The people you follow say something about you. This may be a personal thing, but I like to ensure that the people I follow are relevant and adding value. You’d be surprised—especially if you’ve been using the platform for some time—at how many of the people you follow add no value.SocialBro is a great tool to help you clean up your following list. Twitter frowns upon following/unfollowing en masse. What does this have to do with etiquette? If you’re invited to a dinner party with a plus-one, you’re going to want to make sure the person you bring is an engaging guest, not a total mess.

I like it because it goes along nicely with my social media as cocktail party analogy. And I’m going to check out SocialBro later today. I’ll post you on results. Meantime, check out the 10 rules and see what you’re doing right – or maybe shouldn’t be doing at all.

July 29, 2013

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) – Marketing Myths

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I’m not assuming summer is quiet for everyone, after all we’re just finished with the Fringe and Summerworks is just around the corner, but in my world there is a definitely useful lull for two to three weeks in summer. It’s a good time to devote to in-house marketing and bigger picture thinking, and getting the reading done that I’d  bookmarked. Thought I’d share some of those bookmarks with you over the next little while.

ETA: Before we begin, I’ve changed the name of this post to add the phrase Marketing Myths. Occurred to me that the original title wasn’t very explanatory. I’ll do that again next time.

Let’s begin.


Marketing Myths You Should Ignore 

I agree with all of them, and nod even more emphatically when I get to number six:

Myth 6: Great marketing works instantly

Fact: Although marketing creates visibility and some tactics can produce instant results, marketing is about sustained contact with your target audience to ensure they know who you are when they are about to buy. Content marketing is not instantaneous. In fact: “Days, weeks, or even months won’t produce results that you will be happy with. Be prepared to put in at least 1 solid year before you start seeing results from content marketing.” It takes time to create enough quality content your target needs to begin producing results. Marketing is an investment and like all good investments, they take time to achieve the greatest gains.

This is why I want to know from clients what they’ve done before, who’s already supported them, how consistent they’ve been in their marketing efforts, even when they don’t have a show or offering. I am a firm believer in “come for the show, stay for the company” – because you want those folks back the next time you do have a show. Doesn’t it make more sense to consistently invest a little bit of time over the season to make sure people are already in your corner? People go towards what they know, remember and recognize and by staying consistently in their peripheral vision, you help them come back to you when you do have a major offering. It’s a change in thought process to go from project to project to what I call an organizational mindset, and one that is extremely valuable. The more present you are, the more present they can be.

June 26, 2013

Cottage Reading, a Social Media Workshop and Dancing to Eminem

534977_10152735580020721_524773827_nAnd we’re back on the grid after a week without internet or cell phone service. Oddly blissful. Somehow a relief to live life without posting, tweeting or instagramming it.

Got a big chunk or reading done, all those downloads and books you mean to read but are short on time or focus. Along with a film script (pretty good) and a novel manuscript (really good) here some of them,  in case you’re interested.

The Science of Marketing  excerpt download from Hubspot

Simon Brault – Notes for APASO, TAPA Toronto – April 12, 2012 – spectacular keynote address

B2B Social Media: A Roadmap To Revenue whitepaper from MarketWired

A few others as well but you get the picture. Things that live in a file on your desktop til you read them.

Also

How to Host a Dinner Party, by Corey Mintz loved it. easy reading, excellent ideas, confirmation of what you might already be doing right, and how to stop doing the wrong things.

Made to Stick by the Heath brothers Excellent excellent book. Why do some ideas thrive while others die?

The Lord of the Rings (first book – what? I’d never read it before. It’s pretty good). 🙂

Cooked by Michael Pollan – GREAT book – cooking via the four elements – earth, air, fire, water. I didn’t know how little I knew about barbecue til last week. Timing was excellent as I was cooking all week at the cottage and my appreciation for stinky cheese grew immeasurably.

Excellent evening last night, hosted by Dancer Transition Resource Centre – a social media 101 workshop for about 25 folks. Smart, inquisitive, not afraid of questions or answers. Had a great time – hope they did too – thanks for having me. One of the participants was telling a story about her most viral post – she’s a dancer and didn’t have a lot going on in the way of performance at one point – being 8 months pregnant and all. So she made a video of something most 8 months pregnant people don’t do, or in fact most un-pregnant people don’t do either.

Amazing.

June 7, 2013

not everything valuable can be measured #TheArtOf

(or, why I like Seth Godin)

one of the amazing speakers at the Art of Marketing conference was marketing genius Seth Godin.

I first came across one of Seth’s blog posts years ago – part of it had something to do with being environmentally friendly and how people were writing “think before you print this” as part of their email signatures in the hopes that people – wouldn’t, and save a tree. Seth said something to the fact that it works the opposite way. I dashed off a quick email with the usual love your blog, love this post and asked why he thought it wasn’t environmentally friendly and went on with my day.

Why isn’t it, you might ask? Because someone who is going to or needs to print an email is going to, regardless of what you put at the bottom asking them not to. And more often then not, an email signature pushes an email to a second page. So instead of being environmentally friendly, you’ve just printed two pages, one of which has no info on it, except a request not to print it.

How did I find this out?

He emailed me back within half an hour. I nearly fell over. Seth Godin emailed me back! I’ve followed his blog ever since.

ANYWAY.

His segment was great – and he said a lot of scary things. Things like “the public does not want to hear from us anymore that era is over they are better at hiding from us than we are at finding them” and  “all interruption is optional” which are scary things to hear when you’re trying to get people to pay attention, whether it’s for shoes or baby clothes or art.

And that the space in between “normal” and “weird” are changing. It used to be that you’d create your product to appeal to the largest (maybe lowest) common denominator. And now there are more options for weird than normal. Like mainstream indie music – (which is a category, BTW).

Some things he said relieved me a bit. Like the title of this post – “not everything valuable can be measured“.
Which can be looked at under the category of “Counting New Beans“.  And we try to do that in our tribe every day.

And the fact that we now live in a connection economy, as opposed to the industrial revolution. “we connect and create value – no one person knows how to make a computer mouse.
We do that every day in the arts – you bring the script and he’ll bring the set design and she’ll being the lighting design and she’ll sell it all as a package and everyone gets credit for their contribution.

And one that struck me – if you want to reach people, you have to have something they want.
What do we have that people want? And not what we want, or want them to want – what they want.

And please don’t say you don’t care what they want, and it’s your art and if they don’t understand it it’s their concern. Because the second you ask people for their time at 8 pm on a Friday, and ask them to pay you to give you their time – it is your concern.

Food for thought.

One question from the audience kind of threw me – a woman saying her creative team was exhausted and verging on burnout and she really wanted to know what to do about it.

Give them a break. Let the focus slide for a second. You know how it’s said that if you’re working on the computer, you need to look up and away every half hour or so to give your eyes a break? Do that for your creativity. Do something that is outside of what you normally create. If you write, then draw. If you draw, then knit. Go to a movie. I do that a lot – it’s a trick I learned from Don Draper on MadMen. Or another: (panel from The Oatmeal)

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Or I go to a conference on marketing where nothing is expected of me except to learn.

May 15, 2013

What You’ve Got is What I Need

46178_183984895086027_1621119881_nClients sometimes wonder what I need to do my job well for their company, their show. The quick answer is I will take any info you have to share as more is better than less. The companies I’ve worked with in the past few months have helped shape this list by being amazingly nimble, quick to permit and helpful – there was a genuine sense of teamwork on getting the word out about their show. It wasn’t just my job, or just their job, it was our job.

The longer list form is, as a starter:

– your show description. In all forms, including what you said about the project in your funding proposal. Yes, I know that it’s written in grant-speak. I am fluent in that.

– names of everyone involved. Cast, crew, creative, designers, administrators. And at least one thing that makes them awesome. They must be – you’ve hired them.

– photos/images. any and all. Headshots, phone pics of rehearsals, production stills, the poster image, the outtakes of the poster image shoot – all of them as soon as possible. Bios as well please. This is the start of my collateral.

– your social media. Not necessarily the keys to the car, but I need to know how often you post things and where. It also gives me a sense of your posting aesthetic. We can talk about permissions at another time.

– a contact list, including your box office person, and your point person wherever you are rehearsing and performing

– to be on the distribution list for the dailies. To be able to stop by rehearsals.

– discussion about posters and postcards and shelter ads and print ads and program ads and who and where and what they’ll be. and then a discussion about what else we’re going to do in addition to those things

– decisions and quick turnarounds on approvals. Someone once said you either need to have a lot of time or a lot of money to do things, and odds are good we don’t have a lot of either.

– commitment to the schedule. Many folks are still under the misguided impression that social media is all whenever you feel like it whimsy. Sure it is. Those are the filler posts. What you’re not seeing is a finely tuned editorial calendar that is set to coincide with posts and tweets and e-newsletters and shares and hashtags and reviews and events and pull quotes and reciprocals and cross promos and interviews and video. It’s all intertwined. And very much planned.

– in case that one was a bit scary, I’ll add to it a sense of fun. Willingness to go a bit further than you expected. And willingness to trust. We’re all in this together.

I might come back and add this to this post at a later time when I think of more things.  I’m tired today having spent spent my evening searching for clues and maps, getting and sending texts from and to mysterious organizations, meeting an equally mysterious man in an alley way and participating in a supernatural ritual. It was an excellent night overall, made some new friends and went to bed – after I washed the blood out of my hair.
This is all to say that when Visitations remounts you need to go and see it. Rather, you need to go experience it and be prepared to play. Great work from the folks at Mission Business. I hope more folks start doing theatre like this if for no other reason than people who are not in our industry attend it.  They’ve gotten a new audience. Well done. Thanks for the experience.

Photo from Mission Business Facebook Page

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