Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

November 19, 2013

AntiSocial Media

from socialmedia today

…4 in 5 people are seeing increased incivility on social media, and 2 in 5 have unfriended or blocked family, friends or coworkers as a result.

Additional findings include:

  • 76 percent of respondents have witnessed an argument on social media
  •  88 percent believe people are less polite on social media than in person
  • 1 in 5 reduced in-person contact with someone over a cyber fight read more

antisocial_0409

And at the same time: Weird Social Media Strategy

August 11, 2013

Sunday Roundup – August 11

And with that, it’s a month and a day til my birthday. Just sayin’.

About last week…

What to do with the Art?

Who are Your People?

Couple Facebooky articles for Clients and Colleagues

WORKSHOPS and TEACHING UPDATES!

Reminder I am giving a full day workshop September 21, in association with Humber College. Finding Your Audience: Social Media for Artists  Diving into social media can be intimidating. Expert Sue Edworthy will demystify the process and get you going on your own social media strategy in this one-day intensive workshop developed specifically for artists of all disciplines.   Both theoretical and practical, in this workshop you will learn about social media strategy and then get “hands-on” on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube etc.  Case studies from Canada and around the world will be presented to illustrate some winning approaches. Details to come soon.

And Tell Me About It with DTRC/Artists’ Health went so well, we’re figuring out a three class intensive to follow up to that, broken into beginners, strategy, and a master class. Fall 2013, details to come soon.

And back at the Chang School at Ryerson this fall for another round of CDAM 101 Communication and Promotion for the Arts. Seven weeks on Monday evenings, details to follow.

 

August 4, 2013

Sunday Roundup – August 4

Unbelievably, it’s August.

Last week was a week of sharing bookmarks I’ve collected over the last little while, mostly items about social media engagement.

What did we talk about?

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) – Marketing Myths

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #2 – Twitter Etiquette

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #3 – Facebook Engagement

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #4 – All Caps and Hashtag History

July 30, 2013

Summer Can Be Quiet(er) #2 – Twitter Etiquette

bookmark-30Continuing on from yesterday – another bookmark – today we’re looking at Twitter Etiquette.

The 10 Essentials of Twitter Etiquette

#2 speaks for itself I think – 2. #Dont #Overuse #Hashtags #In #Your #Tweets #It #Looks #Ridiculous #Stick #To #Three #Or #Fewer #TwitterEtiquette Need we say more? No? Good, ‘cuz we’re out of space.

Why do people do this? Possibly because they want to be searched under as many criteria as possible. Most likely. But it’s irritating as all get out and makes me wonder if you really had anything to say to begin with. And if what you actually had to say is simply the base for hashtags? Hmm.

#5 – equally valid. 5. The people you follow say something about you. This may be a personal thing, but I like to ensure that the people I follow are relevant and adding value. You’d be surprised—especially if you’ve been using the platform for some time—at how many of the people you follow add no value.SocialBro is a great tool to help you clean up your following list. Twitter frowns upon following/unfollowing en masse. What does this have to do with etiquette? If you’re invited to a dinner party with a plus-one, you’re going to want to make sure the person you bring is an engaging guest, not a total mess.

I like it because it goes along nicely with my social media as cocktail party analogy. And I’m going to check out SocialBro later today. I’ll post you on results. Meantime, check out the 10 rules and see what you’re doing right – or maybe shouldn’t be doing at all.

July 18, 2013

Why Folks are Liking Us and What We’re Using Social Media-wise

Too hot to read much today so we’ll head for an infographic or two. Replace “brand fan” with “art supporter” or “theatre company” and there you go. Are all these reasons true for your facebook page? Are you doing all these things to get more folks to your page and have them stay there?

brand fan

Let’s look at what we’re using to get folks’ attention: interesting that facebook likes for “your theatre company” are as prevalent as like for “insert global brand here”. Let’s keep it up. How are we using these tactics and tools to get real life interactions going?

Seriously – it’s HOT out. Stay cool, stay hydrated. See you soon.

Infographic-How-Do-Small-Businesses-Reach-Customers

July 1, 2013

Double Roundup Monday July 1

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Happy Canada Day and Happy Pride Weekend – hope everyone had and is having a marvelous time and aren’t too sunburned. Please SPF and hydrate.

Got back in town late last Sunday so there was no roundup, and then the week was all about getting back into the swing of things so here you go – one giant roundup. The “from the archives” seemed to work for you last week, so that might continue to happen on holidays. But only holidays because with the amount I read last week and the Fringe opening this week – well there’s far too much to talk about.

Onward!

 

From the Archives: SWF Seeks Basic Website – must be attractive, clean and open to sharing…

From The Archives: #Twitter #Mistakes in the #Arts, and Something To Keep In Mind

From The Archives: My Thoughts on Starting a Theatre Company

Web 2.0, User Reviews & Ticket Sales

Cottage Reading, a Social Media Workshop and Dancing to Eminem

The Fringe is Less than a WEEK AWAY!

Introducing: The 2013 Fringe Club!

 

 

June 19, 2013

From The Archives: #Twitter #Mistakes in the #Arts, and Something To Keep In Mind

 

This from the website From A Younger Theatre. From their About section:

A Younger Theatre is a platform for young people to express their views on theatre and performance. The site is maintained, edited and published by under 26 year olds who all have a passion for theatre.  A Younger Theatre is a resource and platform for theatre and young people.

You’d better believe I’ve got them bookmarked. Anyway from them:

Theatre Thought: Ten common mistakes that arts organisations make when using Twitter

~~~~~~

Also from another bookmark-worthy site – If you are not following Mission Paradox, you should be. I normally link to the post I like, but I want this one on my blog in its entirety because it’s something we all need to keep in mind.

Random thoughts on privilege, the arts and empathy

Self awareness is important.  When a leader of well respected, well resourced arts organization speaks about the “industry”, they have to be aware of the privilege they live in.

For every 1 person making a living in the “professional” arts there are 15 other people who would like to make a living but, for a variety of reasons, are not able to do so.

This matters.  It’s a source of real pain and concern for a lot of people.  It’s important to show awareness of that when discussing the field.

On the other hand, most people with privilege don’t really FEEL privileged.

I’ve talked to a ton of people who make a living in the arts.  When they described their lives and the challenges they have to navigate on a daily basis, I don’t envy them at all.

I wouldn’t want their six figure paycheck.  I wouldn’t want to have to deal with the things they have to deal with.

I find myself thinking about empathy more and more.  It’s so easy for us to jump into our perspective corners:

Bloated, ego filled administrators versus underpaid, long suffering artists.

Overwhelmed administrators versus spoiled, naive artists.

It can get ugly fast.

The key to avoiding that is developing an ability to see and respect the point of view of others . . . even if you really disagree with that view.

More empathy.  More compassion.  We need that in this industry.

June 17, 2013

From the Archives: SWF Seeks Basic Website – must be attractive, clean and open to sharing…

In the past year or so, I’ve been asked a particular question, or had people ask people to ask me a question, or people tell people to ask me a question to ask other people. I hear it  by phone, in person, via Twitter and Facebook:

Does anyone know how much it costs to set up a basic website?

I have yet to answer or hear anyone else answer this question with a figure as end-of-disussion. So I pondered a bit and thought for the New Year it would be a lovely start to answer this  question by turning to colleague and local expert Avery Swartz. The answer is in here, but there’s so much more to think about.

I love working with Avery – she’s responsible for the banner at the top of this page, my business cards, my font choices, my ads in print and online. She’s awesome. So off I went and asked her. read on and be illuminated!

What exactly is a basic website – what does that phrase mean to a designer?
I like to think of websites in terms of functionality.  What do you want your website to DO?  Note: a website’s functionality shouldn’t be confused with its purpose.  The purpose of a website is to sell something, offer information about a company, give directions to an event, etc.  The functionality of a website is HOW you achieve your website’s purpose.  

For me, as a website designer and developer (I both design and build websites), a BASIC website is one that has very very limited functionality.  We’re talking about words and pictures, and that’s it.  Very few webpages (under 5), and nothing changes often (i.e. – no updates needed).  That kind of website is sometimes referred to as a “brochure website”, since its main purpose is to offer information.  There will probably be an “about” page, a “contact” page, and maybe one or two more webpages.

Also, if a client comes to me asking for a “basic website”, it means that all the content for the website (the text, the images, the client’s logo or any other graphic elements needed) will be supplied.  If I need to design a logo, any special graphics, do any photoshop work on your pictures, or help you with your copy, then it’s not “basic” any more.

So how much does a basic website cost? 

If you work with me, it’s going to be about $1000 (or less for arts groups and charities).  You can also find a student or a web designer who is just starting out, and they might charge you $300-$500.

What in your experience does that mean to a client?
Usually, a client thinks the same thing as me for a “basic website”.  Text, images, and just a few webpages.

But, if a client does have a different idea of what a “basic website” is, then it’s usually because they think a “basic website” includes more functionality.  Any time you want something beyond text, pictures, and a handful of webpages (that all have the same layout), then you’ve stepped outside the realm of “basic”.

Extra functionality can include: more than just a few webpages, the ability to update the website yourself, blog integration, e-commerce or online shopping, photo galleries, video, any kind of user interaction (forums, the ability to comment, membership areas), anything that requires enhanced security and encryption, websites that look great on mobile devices as well as desktop computers, social media integration, etc etc etc.

More often than not, when a client comes to me asking for a “basic website”, I help them understand that they probably want more than just the basics.  Most of the fun stuff on the internet can be found in the extra functionality I listed above.  And of course, all that can drive the price up.  But, I’m guessing that your company/business/show probably isn’t “basic”, so you probably don’t really want your website to be either.

If a client is just starting out and is working on a shoestring, are there free or inexpensive ways for them to create their own site?
Absolutely.  But don’t necessarily expect it to be painless.  There’s a reason why people like me are in business.  The DIY options for websites have come a long way in the last 10 years, but there is always at least a small technical hurdle or two.  If you’re not internet savvy, you might find you’re in over your head.  But, there’s no reason not to try, and you might find you can make something pretty good-looking just by rolling up your sleeves and getting your hands dirty.

You can definitely set up your own website through WordPress.com.  You can even have your own domain name.  My suggestion with WordPress though – keep it simple.  Choose a really clean theme (aka template), and exercise restraint.  Wordpress is pretty powerful, and I’ve seen people go nuts trying to “enhance” their website, and it ends up looking like a giant mess.

If you’re a visual artist, you really need to have a Behance.net account.  If you put in the time to make it really nice, you can even have that as your website.  Consider getting a Behance Pro account.  It will make your Behance profile into a portfolio website, without the logos and branding from Behance.  No one will be the wiser, and it looks great.  Check out these examples:

You can do the same thing with Cargo:

If you make something handmade, there’s no excuse for you to not be on Etsy.  Even if you have your own website, you should still be on Etsy.  There are people who are actively looking for handmade goods, searching on that website, who would never find you otherwise.  It’s worth the slight fee it costs to put your products up.

And finally, more and more people are making Facebook pages for their businesses, and skipping a professional website altogether.  I don’t recommend this, mostly because Facebook business pages aren’t search engine-optimized (i.e. – it’s going to be harder to find your Facebook page on Google than it is to find your business website), but I don’t think there’s any harm in doing both (a website plus a Facebook page for your business).

Oh, one more note.  Don’t try and build a website using some silly program on your computer.  Microsoft Word is for writing a letter or a grant application – it’s not for building a website.  Even iWeb, the program on your Mac, is a mess.  It writes bad code that isn’t cross–browser compatible (i.e. It’s not going to look good in every web browser that people use).  If you’re going to try the DIY route, go with something mainstream, contemporary, and web-based.

is there anything a client forgets or might not think about including in their basic website that are essential?
The basics are the basics.  Good, clean layout. Readability.  Easy to navigate. Contact information up front (no one wants to search for your phone number or your address).  When in doubt, keep things simple.

So for the sake of comparison – is my website basic?
Nope! You have lots of fun extra functionality. Blogging (and everything that goes with that, including comments), the ability to update the site yourself, social media integration, contact form, and a flexible mobile version.

I know WordPress did most of that for you. So there are DIY options for people that want even more than a “basic” website.

Any other thoughts?
Whether you’re using a DIY website option, or working with a web designer, make sure your website accurately reflects your business and your level of professionalism.  Just like it’s simply unacceptable in this day and age to not have a website for your business, it’s also unacceptable for that website to look like junk.  Think of how you behave when you’re online.  If you check out a website for a shop, or a restaurant, or a newspaper, do you judge the business by the way their website looks or behaves?  Of course you do.  We all do.  So just remember that people are judging you too.  Sometimes you get what you pay for.

I think people often confuse the idea of a “basic website” with a “clean website”. Basic = very little functionally. Clean = good design. Clean does not necessarily mean basic. There are oodles of very attractive (and very complex) websites out there that are clean, but definitely not basic.

 

Think of Twitter. Google. Apple. All very clean (design), but definitely not basic (functionality).

 

Somehow people have a kooky idea that clean design is easy, so it should be cheap. Clean design is NOT easy. It’s often the most difficult thing to do, because it requires great vision, clarity, and restraint. If clean design was easy, there wouldn’t be so much crap out there.

What are you up to next?
I’m returning to work after 9 months of maternity leave, so I’m ready to take on new clients and new projects.  I’m always working on professional development, and studying up on the latest web trends.  Right now I’m kind of obsessed with “responsive web design”, which is a technique for making websites look fantastic on mobile devices AND desktop computers (without sacrificing one for the other)

Thanks Avery! I repeat – you are awesome.

About Avery – Avery Swartz is a Toronto-based award-winning web designer.  A self-described design geek, she helps to demystify the web for small business owners, charities, and arts organizations.  Avery believes that designing websites should be an enjoyable experience for everyone involved.  She offers a friendly, casual approach and promises to use as little technical mumbo-jumbo as possible.  You can contact Avery and view her portfolio online at www.averyswartz.com.

When she’s not making websites, Avery writes the blog Stuff Avery Likes, featuring news and info on design, travel, internet trends, and living in Leslieville with her husband, dog, and baby girl.  Check it out at www.stuffaverylikes.com.

April 15, 2013

A 21st C Radio Play tells a story, so does your brand

Titanic_by_amadscientistHanging out for dinner with friends last night and one kept checking her phone – I asked what she was looking at, and she tuned me in to this extremely cool twitter feed  – Titanic Real Time – within minutes I was fascinated too. “Experience Titanic’s epic journey with minute-by-minute tweets as if from on board the ship itself. Created by @TheHistoryPress  – the UK’s largest local and specialist history publisher.

Utterly amazing – a live-tweeting (sort of) thread telling the  complete story of an event we all know quite well – the night the Titanic sank. It’s told from the viewpoint of  various individuals, during the sinking of the ship, all marked by hashtags  – #crew, #captain, #firstclass and so on. Absolutely amazing to read as a thread, and was completely riveting to watch as it unfolded in real-time. It made me think of a radio play, in that you couldn’t see what was happening, you were reliant on tweets from various individuals, and their perspectives of what was happening. I guess it seemed a combination book/radio play because you were getting the information of what was happening in 140 characters or less, without the benefit of Foley. Remember a while back I wrote about Sometimes Hearing is Believing ? It’s that same sort of feeling – pure storytelling.

What is this in aid of? History Press is the UK’s largest local and specialist history publisher. They’re booksellers. They have come up with what I think is a fantastic way to engage the internet/social media generation in their paper product.  Brilliant. It’s made me even happier to know that – excellent innovative way to marry these two things.

Anyway – loved it. They’re doing WhitechapelRealTime in August  – Follow the Whitechapel police investigations of 1888 from the perspective of the detectives, officers and Whitechapel residents  – and I will definitely be tuning in.

Speaking of stories,  post from Seth Godin – in class a few weeks ago I was explaining what brand is, and what brand is not. And here it is again.

Have a good Monday – the sun is shining. So far.

 

 

 

April 9, 2013

Quantifying the Qualifiable

A couple of thoughts.

I can absolutely appreciate anyone who doesn’t “get” social media and its value. I look forward to helping/facilitating them to get on the path to getting it. That’s a big chunk of my job. And I absolutely love seeing the nod, the light go on, the excitement about getting it.

What do they need to do?

Be willing to try to get it.  If you are not willing to try to “get it” – you won’t. And no matter what I say, explain, demonstrate – you won’t get it. And you will leave unsatisfied, and not getting it. You’ll be irritated, I’ll feel bad. Harumph.

Why do folks sometimes not get it? Lots of reasons: they’re in unfamiliar territory, they’re not quite sure, they’ve never really used it before, you name it. All viable reasons.

And some are trapped in quantifying qualifiable experiences. A horrifying place to be, I’ve been there, because they are counting beans, and we need to come up with some new ones to count. Because counting old beans with new counting mechanisms does not work.

Which leads to a  mashup repost today from two previous posts on this sort of topic.

Two articles from quite different blogs  – Seth’s Blog and Mission Paradox – that seemingly agree on the same thing – that unanimous is not an option and the devil doesn’t need advocates. Well timed.

An article for you to read on how to convince the AD/ED/GM etc that social media does work.

And a recommendation to pick up a copy of Counting New Beans. 

Or at least google the phrase to get an idea of what it means. Image and statement from the website. Hopefully it piques your interest.

coverforweb

We make art because we believe it makes better human beings. We make art because we believe it makes being human better. So why do we spend so much energy quantifying the economics of what we do, and so little time quantifying the impact?

 

 

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